B2B Marketers on the Move

B2B Marketers on the Move

The B2B marketing landscape consists of swift changes, with growth often happening at a speedy pace that can sometimes be difficult to fully appreciate.

For over 20 years TopRank Marketing has been honored to help some of the world’s top B2B marketers and brands elevate and go beyond merely being competitive, to standing out from the crowd with a variety of creative and award-winning successes. In this spirit we regularly like to take a moment to congratulate and honor business marketers, thought leaders, industry influencers and our own team members who have recently advanced in their careers.

When B2B marketers take on new roles in leadership, it’s only natural to seek out trusted resources to help them hit the ground running, and TopRank Marketing is happy to have been a go-to B2B content and influencer marketing agency for a powerful array of marketers in new leadership roles. We’re also always seeking out B2B technology industry influencers advancing in their careers to partner with on unique content collaborations.

We’d like to extend big congratulations to our B2B technology industry partners, clients, associates, friends and teammates in this third edition of B2B Marketers on the Move.

Celebrating 2022 B2B Marketers on the Move

Tequia Burt
Tequia Burt has taken a new position as editor in chief, LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Blog at LinkedIn*.

“Be brave. Much of the time, we are afraid to bring our authentic and true selves to work, but in order to be an authentic storyteller and marketer who connects with audiences, you can’t be fake.”

Tequia’s keen B2B content marketing insight led her to be featured on our annual list of top B2B content marketing influencers, in “Top 25 B2B Content Marketing Influencers and Experts To Follow #CMWorld 2021.”

Rebecca Stone
Rebecca Stone has taken a new position as senior vice president of customer solutions marketing at Cisco.

Marcus Tober
Marcus Tober has taken a new position as head of enterprise solutions at Semrush.

“SEO takes time and patience, and engagement from multiple departments in companies. SEO should be a focus, because when demand rises and advertising costs increase again, starting SEO is too late,”

Marcus’ search marketing insight was featured in our look at pandemic search engine optimization (SEO) tips, “Best SEO Tips for Marketing During the Pandemic Plus 9 Top SEO Platforms.”

Elizabeth Williams
Elizabeth Williams has been promoted to director of new business and client accounts at TopRank Marketing.

“The marvelous impact we can make for our clients — for their businesses and for them as marketers and humans — is what keeps me inspired.”

Danny Nail
Danny Nail has taken a new position as director, global ABM COE leader, at Salesforce.

“You have to let go of templatized, old ideas. You have to break free of thinking about things the way we’ve always thought about them, and start really digging into how you can change what you’re doing and make it more efficient, more effective, but be creative about that.”

Danny sat down with our own senior content marketing manager Joshua Nite for our ongoing multiple-season Break Free B2B Marketing video and podcast series to speak about account-based-marketing (ABM) on a global scale in, Break Free B2B Marketing: Danny Nail of SAP on Creating a Global ABM Platform.

Debbie Friez
Debbie Friez has been promoted to influencer marketing manager at TopRank Marketing.

“I am thankful for almost 7 years of working with the amazing, smart, talented team at TopRank Marketing. Every day I look forward to new challenges and exciting experiences. The best part of my job is learning from the many thought leaders some will call influencers. I truly treasure the relationships I’ve built with so many great minds.”

Brian Hood
Brian Hood has been promoted to vice president, digital product management and marketing technology, at Thomson Reuters.

Jennifer Leggio
Jennifer Leggio has taken a new position as chief marketing officer at Netography.

“I often joke that people don’t find marketing; that it finds us. It’s a career path for creative empaths who also live and die by the stories that data tells us. These things make us brilliant and impactful, but also make us vulnerable. My greatest advice to B2B marketing up-and-comers is to stay strong and fearless when working with people who don’t get us or our craft — because very few do — and keep your eye on the outcomes. There is no greater joy than seeing that final campaign, design, or story win, so never stop pushing for them.”

Jennifer has been featured as one of the most influential women in B2B marketing on several of our annual industry lists, including “50 Influential Women in B2B Marketing Who Rocked in 2020.”

Jane Bartel
Jane Bartel has been promoted to director of content and search at TopRank Marketing.

“One of my favorite things about good B2B content marketing is that it’s so focused on adding value for the audience More than in the B2C space, B2B content marketers are asking themselves, ‘is the content I’m producing going to help the person consuming it solve a problem?’”

Elizabeth Dieckman
Elizabeth Dieckman has been promoted to director of product marketing at LinkedIn*.

Adolfo Alvarado
Adolfo Alvarado has taken a new position as SEO strategist at TopRank Marketing.

Amber Naslund
Amber Naslund has been promoted to senior manager, marketing solutions, at LinkedIn*.

“Never be afraid to explore paths you hadn’t considered before. Sometimes the most exciting opportunities are the ones that are most unexpected, don’t look like a ladder climb, and weren’t necessarily in your plan. And that feeling of imposter syndrome? It’s really just a sign you’re stepping outside your comfort zone. Say yes to the exploratory call, be courageous, and recognize that the most powerful words in your career journey can be what if?”

Amber has been featured on our most recent annual list of the top 50 B2B marketing influencers, and shared the digital stage with our CEO Lee Odden on an episode of LinkedIn’s Live with Marketers Home Edition, focusing on “The Business of Executive Thought Leadership.”

Mia Umanos
Mia Umanos has been promoted to chief executive officer at Clickvoyant.

Alexander White
Alexander White has taken a new position as social media and influencer marketing coordinator at TopRank Marketing.

Jason Miller
Jason Miller has taken a new position as marketing director at CreativeX.

“As a marketer, the best advice I’ve ever been given is to focus on your soft skills. There are a lot of savvy marketers who all know how to do the same things; the differentiator is how you excel at creativity, problem-solving, and communication. Master these skills, and you will not only stand out, but you will also be on the path to becoming a strong marketing leader. I learned this the hard way and paid the price by losing opportunities early on in my career. Map these skills out immediately, double down, and get to work.”

Jason was among those featured on our most recent annual list of the top B2B marketing influencers, in “50 Top B2B Marketing Influencers, Experts and Speakers To Follow In 2022,” and on our look at “LinkedIn’s List of 24 B2B Marketers You Need to Know.”

Amy Otis
Amy Otis has taken a new position as account manager at TopRank Marketing.

Keith Guse
Keith Guse has taken a new position as associate director, social media, at Merck.

Nick Nelson
Nick Nelson has been promoted to senior content marketing manager at TopRank Marketing.

“What I’ve found at TopRank Marketing is an accommodating environment, meaningful work, amazing colleagues, clear avenues for growth, and a real sense of pride.”

Christina Stelene
Christina Stelene has been promoted to director of demand generation and digital sales, training and adoption Americas, at SAP.

Danielle Motley
Danielle Motley has taken a new position as account manager at TopRank Marketing.

Waynette Tubbs
Waynette Tubbs has taken a new position as director of content marketing at Oracle.

“Make your customer the hero. Tell your customers’ stories about how they solve problems using your product.”

Waynette was featured on our look at some of the inspirational content that leading marketing industry professionals have crafted, in “10 Inspiring Expert Quotes That Honor Timeless Content Marketing Best Practices.”

Harry Mackin
Harry Mackin has taken a new position as content strategist at TopRank Marketing.

Anna Griffin
Anna Griffin has taken a new position as chief marketing officer at Intercom.

Kay Stone
Kay Stone has taken a new position as director of social media and influencer marketing at TopRank Marketing.

Mark Barrera
Mark Barrera has been promoted to vice president of audience and content acquisition at TrustRadius.

“Always look at ways to bring value to a business beyond tasks that may be tied to your current role. This allows you to take on more and show that your worth is beyond what it’s currently being used for.”

Steve Lewis
Steve Lewis has taken a new position as social media manager at TopRank Marketing.

Virginia Brailey
Virginia Brailey has taken a new position as chief executive officer at Xemoto.

“As much as I love marketing and technology, there is nothing better than bringing people with diverse strengths together and building a strong team. If you really want to exceed in the marketplace you need to first succeed in the workplace.”

Sam Kirchoff
Sam Kirchoff has taken a new position as internal marketing manager at TopRank Marketing.

“I like working at TopRank because it’s one of the only agencies I’ve worked at where I felt welcomed as the person I was, not the person they wanted me to be. I’ve worked here twice: once at the very beginning of my career and now, ten years later, as someone with more experience. Both times I’ve made professional and personal connections that have made a real difference in my life. It’s an easy place to feel passion and care for your clients and coworkers because that same energy is reflected all around you. It’s an easy place to be.”

Brooke Osmundson
Brooke Osmundson has taken a new position as lead of digital marketing at Smith Micro Software, Inc.

Theresa Dorsey Meis
Theresa Dorsey Meis has taken a new position as content strategist at TopRank Marketing.

Sarah McLaughlin
Sarah McLaughlin has been promoted to vice president of marketing at R3 IoT Limited.

“You can achieve any ambition during your marketing career. Don’t underestimate your potential, ability, or worth. I went from high school dropout, to single parent, to VP Marketing with four beautiful daughters. Set yourself goals. Invest in your personal growth. And don’t settle. When looking for your next career move, choose a role, company, or industry outside your current comfort zone. You will grow enormously, both personally and professionally.”

Sara Varni
Sara Varni has taken a new position as chief marketing officer at Attentive.

Art Allen
Art Allen has taken a new position as content strategist at TopRank Marketing.

Abby Johnson
Abby Johnson has been promoted to director of communications at Gray.

“Having a career in marketing isn’t for the faint of heart. It takes hard work, passion, commitment, continuous learning, creativity, and a touch of obsessive-compulsive behavior. But that’s what makes marketers special. Effective marketers today understand this complex, ever-evolving environment and turn challenges into opportunities. At its core, marketing is about creating experiences. We, as marketers, have the power to make these positive or negative. This perspective continues to inspire me.”

Abby has been featured in an installment of our annual list of women who rock social media, a tradition that we’ve continued each year, including our most recently look at “25 Women of Color Who Rocked B2B Marketing in 2021.”

Thanks To These Top Leaders For Helping Elevate the B2B Marketing Industry

Thanks to all of the talented B2B marketing professionals here who have recently been promoted or taken new industry positions. We’re certain that you’ll elevate and reach new heights when it comes to the performance you’ll deliver in your new roles.

You can find our previous edition of “Saluting B2B Marketers on the Move” here.

If you’re looking for a change of your own, be sure to check out our list of current job openings at TopRank Marketing on our careers page.

*LinkedIn and SAP are TopRank Marketing clients.

The post B2B Marketers on the Move: 2022 Brings New Opportunities appeared first on B2B Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

We Analyzed The Top 7,000 Websites in 22 Industries. Here's What We Learned About Their Approach to SEO and Paid Advertising.

We analyzed more than 7,000 company websites across 22 industries to answer one question: what was their approach to SEO and paid advertising to help them do so well?

In this analysis, we only looked at companies that ranked well and had at least a 4-star review or higher. These businesses aren’t just liked by Google, they’re also liked by customers.

Where’s the Data From?

We used the consumer review website TrustPilot to select the 7,000+ websites with a review rating of 4-stars or more and then cross-referenced this data with Ubersuggest to see which were liked by both users and Google.

Through Ubersuggest, we learned more about their approach to SEO, traffic factors, backlinks, and more which you will see in the visualizations below.

What Industries Did We Look At?

The 22 industries analyzed in this report were:

  • Education and Training
  • Public & Local Services
  • Home Services
  • Animal & Pets
  • Vehicles & Transportation
  • Media & Publishing
  • Sports
  • Hobbies & Crafts
  • Events & Entertainment
  • Restaurants & Bars
  • Travel & Vacation
  • Shopping & Fashion
  • Electronics & Technology
  • Food, Beverages & Tobacco
  • Home & Garden
  • Business Services
  • Money & Insurance
  • Legal Services & Government
  • Health & Medical
  • Construction and Manufacturing
  • Beauty & Well-being
  • Utilities

Key Findings

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to digital marketing. Black and white advice doesn’t work for every company.

You will need to take a different approach depending on the audience in your industry. That is why we included a wide range of industries in our analysis instead of just making blanket statements.

Here are a few key insights we found:

  • Companies in all industries get more organic traffic than paid traffic. However, Restaurants & Bars and Travel & Vacation received more paid traffic compared to other industries.
  • The average website authority score was between 30 and 40 for the companies in each industry analyzed. Some industries, such as Utilities and Animals & Pets, were lower than average.
  • Public & Local Services face the highest average keyword difficulty for target terms. Beauty & Well-Being faced the lowest average difficulty for target keywords.
  • More than 75% of total backlinks across all industries were text backlinks.
  • Companies in all industries targeted more informational intent keywords, however traffic volume was driven by a mix of different intent keywords.

Analysis #1 – Organic Search Traffic vs Paid Search Traffic Volume

Does most of your traffic come from paid ads or organic search? We looked at the difference in volume between organic search traffic (traffic driven from search engines like Google) and paid traffic (traffic driven to your site via paid ads.)

These trends highlight where industry leaders are focusing their marketing efforts—and whether those results are paying off. We found several interesting trends in this data.

NOTE: the numbers below represent the average organic and paid traffic per company website, not a total of all traffic in that industry.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Organic Vs. Paid Traffic #1

Public & Local Services received 216,861 visits from organic search and only 16,931 from paid search, less than 10 percent of total traffic. Public services, like a power company, are unlikely to use paid ads since people will generally just choose one of the few services offered in their area.

Focusing on SEO can benefit these companies more. That said, the low competition for paid ads could represent an opportunity to boost their presence.

Companies focused on Education and Training received the most organic searches at 230,075 visits per month. These companies should focus more on SEO and content marketing but also keep an eye on how to leverage paid ads since competition is low.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Organic Vs. Paid Traffic #2

Restaurant & Bars sites, on the other hand, rely more heavily on paid traffic compared to all industries with almost 50% coming from paid ads.

People searching in this category are probably looking for somewhere to go soon so using paid ads to increase conversions makes sense.

Travel & Vacation sites also rely on paid ads that results in close to 30 percent of their traffic. Organic traffic is still higher but it looks like companies also boost their offerings through paid ads.

If you are new to the sector, focus on increasing organic traffic right away as it will take longer to see results. Paid ads are effective as well, but they can be expensive.

Shopping & Fashion only got a bit less than 10 percent of traffic from paid ads. This could mean companies focus more on social sharing and social media ads since a lot of content is visual.

The Sports industry received the least traffic from paid ads at under 4 percent. This was interesting since the industry includes a lot of ecommerce brands that sell sports gear, outdoor apparel, sports drinks, and team apparel.

This could indicate a trend towards more social sharing and social media ads as well. It could also mean impulse purchases are less common since customers are more likely do their research. Therefore, creating educational content might be the way to go.

Analysis #2 – Trends Related To Authority Score, Keyword Difficulty, and Average CPC

How does domain authority vary across industries? Does it correlate with how much you’ll pay for ads? Does keyword difficulty have an effect? We dug into this data to see trends for each industry.

Authority Score measures your website’s Domain Authority which also influences rankings. It grades the overall website quality based on the number of backlinks, referring domains, outbound links, etc.

Authority Score is also relative to your industry.

Average Authority Scores Across All Industries

This first chart shows the average website authority score for businesses in each industry.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Review Rating Vs. Authority Score

The average authority score was between 30-40 for business websites in each industry.

Hundreds of business sites were looked at in each industry with a mix of higher and lower authority scores, resulting in the numbers above.

Media & Publishing had the highest average authority score of 44.62 followed very closely by Public & Local Services at 44.61. Business sites in each sector are usually more trusted sources so this makes sense.

On the flip side, the lowest authority score industries were Utilities at 28.09 and Animals & Pets at 27.08. A lot of factors could have led to this such as many new sites created in each industry.

There was close to a 20 point variation in authority scores across all industries in this analysis with the median score being 38.06.

  • Websites between 40-50 are considered average
  • Websites between 50-60 are considered good
  • Websites above 60 are considered excellent

What does this mean for business websites and marketers?

This analysis looked at companies with high review ratings which means they placed a lot of emphasis on reputation management, maybe more so than SEO factors.

We can see that a business’s authority score didn’t really impact whether or not they got a high review rating. People-focused more on reviewing products and services than the business itself.

Average SEO Keyword Difficulty Across All Industries

Next, we looked at the average keyword difficulty for terms in each industry. Most content creators target keywords with low difficulty and high volume which is easier for some industries than others.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Review Rating Vs. Keyword Difficulty

Industries with the highest difficulty were Public & Local Services at 49.02, Money & Insurance at 47.72, and Education and Training at 47.62.

To improve their search rankings, these industries will likely need to spend more time on their SEO strategy or invest more heavily in paid ads.

Industries with the lowest difficulty were Shopping & Fashion at 36.26, Sports at 35.12, and Beauty & Well-being at 33.75. It will be easier for these industries to find keywords to rank for.

Across all industries, the average keyword difficulty for SEO is 41.

What does this mean in practice? Relativity matters when looking for low-difficulty keywords.

For example, say you’re a business in the Money & Insurance industry and find two terms you’re not ranking for. One has a keyword difficulty of 45 with a search volume of 12,000, the other has a keyword difficulty of 40 with a search volume of just 6,000.

Understanding that 45 is below the average difficulty in your industry, targeting the higher volume term might not be a bad idea. You could also target related keywords as well and use paid ads to boost some of the more difficult ones to expand your reach.

For industries with low average keyword difficulty like Beauty & Well-being, target easy-to-rank-for terms to increase traffic, then use CRO strategies to leverage that traffic.

Average CPC (Cost-Per-Click) Across All Industries

The final graph of this section looks at the average CPC for each industry. We were curious to see if any correlation existed with the average authority score of company websites. Here’s what we found:

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Review Rating Vs. CPC

Very little correlation between the industry’s average authority score and their average CPC was found.

One factor affecting this might be the difference in acquisition costs and purchase value.

For example, a site selling $20 t-shirts won’t spend $10 per customer but an investment site whose average purchase price is more than $100 might.

In this analysis, Money & Insurance has the highest average CPC at $4.12.

Businesses in this industry might be willing to spend more on average for each click since the lifetime value (LTV) of each customer is much higher.

Hobbies & Crafts has the lowest average CPC of $1.12 across all industries.

They only receive about 5 percent of traffic from paid ads which could indicate that businesses focus more on social channels where many craft/hobbyist groups and influencers exist.

Home Services has a higher average CPC at $3.17. Business sites in this industry include plumbers, lawn care work, etc. Increased competition for local customers has likely led to the higher average CPC.

Shopping & Fashion had one of the lowest average CPC’s at $1.40.

This could be another indication that businesses promote their visual content more on social media. However, the low average CPC could represent an opportunity to get creative with paid ads.

Analysis #3 – Average Number of Backlinks Per Industry and Their Most Popular Formats

Backlinks matter—that’s nothing new. What about the format of those backlinks? Is a text backlink better than an image backlink? How many backlinks is enough?

That’s what we aimed to find out.

Average Number of Backlinks Per Industry

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Average Backlinks

The average number of backlinks varies quite a bit by industry with the most belonging to:

  • Public & Local Services at just over 6.5 million per site
  • Media & Publishing at just over 6 million per site
  • Education and Training at just over 4 million per site

These industries include more trustworthy business sites such as essential local services, news outlets, media publications, universities, certification platforms, and more.

The lowest average backlinks belonged to Beauty & Well-being, Animals & Pets, and Utilities. This could indicate each sector focuses more on social media or they have a lot of new business sites.

Money & Insurance coming in very low was surprising to me. I would have expected the industry to average at least as many backlinks as Shopping & Fashion at just under 1 million per site.

Distribution of Backlinks by Format

We also looked at the distribution of backlink types across each industry to see which performed best. The two backlink types that stood out were:

  • text backlinks
  • image backlinks

NOTE: the graphs below represent the total number of backlinks for each industry, not the average for each company website.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Text Backlinks

Text backlinks were the most popular across all industries:

  • Public & Local Services received the most at just over 1.6 billion
  • Education and Training was next at just over 1.5 billion
  • Business Services followed at just over 1.3 billion
  • Media & Publishing was the last with just over 1 billion
7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Image Backlinks

Image backlinks were the second most popular type. The two industries that used them the most were:

  • Electronics & Technology at close to 180 million
  • Media & Publishing at just over 100 million

The two other types of backlinks used were form and frame backlinks. However, both combined made up less than 5 percent of total backlinks across all business sites in this analysis.

What does this mean?

Text backlinks are the most popular for driving traffic across all industries but some industries will also rely just as much on image backlinks.

You should mix up your approach, leveraging different backlink types to reach different audiences.

Analysis #4 – Target Keyword Intent and the Intent That Led to the Most Traffic

Lastly, we looked at target keyword SEO intent in each industry based on the following categories:

  • Commercial intent keywords: related to specific brands or services (“find a Starbucks near me”)
  • Informational intent keywords: searching for answers to questions (“How to unclog a tub”)
  • Navigational intent keywords: users looking for specific pages (“Comcast login page”)
  • Transactional intent keywords: users are ready to buy (“buy converse shoes”)

Looking at different keyword intents when choosing target terms can highlight trends and opportunities in your industry.

So, what did we learn?

NOTE: The first chart indicates the keyword intent of target terms in each industry. The bottom chart shows which intent type resulted in traffic to each business site.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Keyword Target Search Intent

The most popular keyword intent was informational at more than 40 percent of target terms in all industries.

These are generally top-of-the-funnel keywords, meaning users are still early on in their journey.

The next highest intent type was transactional at between 15-20 percent of terms per industry.

These users are ready to buy so creating content that targets these terms or using paid ads is a good idea.

Next, we looked at which intent keywords drove the most traffic to company sites in each industry.

7000 Websites With 4 Stars or More Review Rating - Traffic Received From Keyword Search Intent

Like most industries, Utilities sites mostly target informational keywords. However, most of their traffic comes from navigational terms which relate more to specific pages and their brand name.

This is likely due to search behavior, rather than incorrect targeting practices.

For example, if someone wanted to pay a power bill, they might type “pay bill X” in Google to find the right page. You wouldn’t target this term directly but it does bring traffic to your site. Focusing on informational keywords that establish trust is still the right approach.

Similarly, Money & Insurance websites focus on informational terms but get most of their traffic from navigational terms.

This could be a combination of good branding as well as similar user search behavior patterns. Usually, for your navigational terms to be successful, users will have read your informational content before deciding you were the right fit for them.

On a different note, Construction & Manufacturing businesses target informational keywords but also target transactional keywords at a higher rate than other industries. Clearly, this strategy works as most of their traffic comes from transactional terms.

Lastly, Home Services target more commercial intent keywords than other industries. These are likely terms more focused on a particular location using phrases such as “near me” or “in [city]”.

However, we can see that just under 50 percent of their traffic comes from transactional terms. This means they might want to adjust their focus to include those terms along with their commercial approach.

Keep in mind that just because your website receives traffic doesn’t mean it is all converting. Make sure your traffic is directed right pages on your site and each page is optimized for conversions.

Conclusion: Summary of Findings

There were a few surprises in this data—and a few things that turned out exactly as we expected.

For example, backlinks matter. Google has been telling us that for years, so I wasn’t surprised to see the highest-reviewed business websites tend to have a pretty high volume of links.

What was surprising was the variation in the types of backlinks between different industries. This data can be incredibly valuable for sites looking to build a more effective backlink profile.

I was also interested in the differences between the types of keyword intent most sites target for SEO (primarily informational) versus where they are getting their traffic from. Depending on your industry, this data could highlight incredible marketing opportunities or gaps in your current strategy.

Which finding was most interesting or useful to you?

Understanding your current marketing processes, knowing how to measure success and being able to identify where you are looking for improvements, are all critical pieces of the CDP decision-making process. But before embarking on the purchase process, it’s important for your organization to decide if a customer data platform is really a good fit.

Start with a comprehensive self-assessment of your organization’s business needs, staff capabilities, management support and financial resources. The following questions should help you decide.


Explore platform capabilities from vendors like Blueconic, Tealium, Treasure Data and more in the full MarTech Intelligence Report on customer data platforms.

Click here to download!


How do we currently manage customer data?

Fragmented pieces of customer data often reside in silos in marketing, sales, purchasing, customer support and other departments. Does your organization have a system that serves as the ultimate authority on customer profiles? Do you know what customer data it includes? Is third-party anonymous data mixed in? How many applications are in your martech stack? And how does data get from one application to another? Is it transferred in real-time? Every hour? Every day? These are all areas where a CDP can help to standardize and streamline data storage and processing. However, another tool you’re using may already handle some of the CDP functionality you’re seeking.

How efficient are our marketing data processes?

Marketing software applications are supposed to improve data and campaign efficiency. But many times, disparate systems lead to data duplication, lack of standardization and an increase in time-consuming manual tasks. If you find yourself spending more time normalizing data or de-duplicating contact records, and less time executing campaigns or evaluating campaign performance, it might be time to automate data integration.

How would a CDP address our business needs and what are our use cases for the technology?

Virtually all CDPs deliver several core capabilities around data management, but many also provide a wide range of data analytics and orchestration features that address diverse business goals. What would having a single view of your customers do for you? For example, do you want to reduce churn by targeting customers with more relevant offers? Or increase the profitability of customer acquisition efforts by creating more accurate lookalike audiences? Don’t invest in a CDP before developing use cases that demonstrate how adoption will improve marketing performance or reduce costs. The investment should more than pay for itself.

Is your organization ready for a CDP?

Do you have enough clarity on your use cases and customer journeys to enable you to choose the correct solution? How will centralizing your data and audience definition impact your organization? Are you confident that all of the teams that would need to be involved — from IT to marketing to customer service — can be educated on the potential value of a CDP as part of the adoption project? Have you chosen early adopters within the organization that can provide proof points to other users?

What systems would we integrate through the CDP?

The martech stack is getting bigger and more complex for many organizations. Streamlining integration is a core benefit of implementing a CDP, which can normalize data for easier importing and exporting into other systems. As more brands engage in omnichannel marketing through numerous martech apps, creating a unified view of the customer has become critical to marketing success.

How will we define and then benchmark CDP success?

What key performance indicators (KPIs) do you want to measure, and what decisions will you make based on CDP implementation? For example, do you want to decrease data redundancy and track how that impacts the velocity of campaign execution? Or do you want to decrease the time your marketing staff spends on manually transferring data from one system to another? Set business goals in advance to be able to benchmark success later on. More than ever before, businesses seek to quantify the ROI of their martech investments.

Do we have management buy-in?

As with any major organizational investment, management support is essential to CDP success. Begin with small, short-term goals that demonstrate how the CDP is benefiting the business, either through cost savings or revenue gains. The key is to convince senior executives that having a single, unified view of the customer will add to the organization’s bottom line.

Do we need self-serve, full-serve or something in between?

CDPs are typically built for marketing end-users. However, CDPs vary in the scope of their capabilities — and it is important to have some level of ongoing training to use them all. CDP vendors provide varying levels of onboarding, customer support and/or professional services. Make sure you understand what your marketing staff will need to know to effectively use the CDP, or if you lack internal resources, what type of managed services are available?

What is the total cost of ownership?

CDP vendors charge monthly license fees based on the number of data records, events (or customer actions) and applications integrated. There may be additional fees for onboarding, APIs/custom integrations or staff training. Make sure you know your business needs, data volume and how you will need to restructure your systems and staff to enable a CDP’s operations. Being aware of all of these aspects will help you understand the investment your organization will make. Keep in mind, too, that you may see cost savings if the system allows people to work more efficiently.

Customer data platforms: A snapshot

What they are. Customer data platforms, or CDPs, have become more prevalent than ever. These help marketers identify key data points from customers across a variety of platforms, which can help craft cohesive experiences. They are especially hot right now as marketers face increasing pressure to provide a unified experience to customers across many channels. 

Understanding the need. Cisco’s Annual Internet Report found that internet-connected devices are growing at a 10% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2018 to 2023. COVID-19 has only sped up this marketing transformation. Technologies are evolving at a faster rate to connect with customers in an ever-changing world.

Each of these interactions has something important in common: they’re data-rich. Customers are telling brands a little bit about themselves at every touchpoint, which is invaluable data. What’s more, consumers expect companies to use this information to meet their needs.

Why we care. Meeting customer expectations, breaking up these segments, and bringing them together can be demanding for marketers. That’s where CDPs come in. By extracting data from all customer touchpoints — web analytics, CRMs, call analytics, email marketing platforms, and more — brands can overcome the challenges posed by multiple data platforms and use the information to improve customer experiences. 

Read next: What is a CDP and how does it give marketers the coveted ‘single view’ of their customers? 

The post Does your organization need a customer data platform? appeared first on MarTech.

Understanding your current marketing processes, knowing how to measure success and being able to identify where you are looking for improvements, are all critical pieces of the CDP decision-making process. But before embarking on the purchase process, it’s important for your organization to decide if a customer data platform is really a good fit.

Start with a comprehensive self-assessment of your organization’s business needs, staff capabilities, management support and financial resources. The following questions should help you decide.


Explore platform capabilities from vendors like Blueconic, Tealium, Treasure Data and more in the full MarTech Intelligence Report on customer data platforms.

Click here to download!


How do we currently manage customer data?

Fragmented pieces of customer data often reside in silos in marketing, sales, purchasing, customer support and other departments. Does your organization have a system that serves as the ultimate authority on customer profiles? Do you know what customer data it includes? Is third-party anonymous data mixed in? How many applications are in your martech stack? And how does data get from one application to another? Is it transferred in real-time? Every hour? Every day? These are all areas where a CDP can help to standardize and streamline data storage and processing. However, another tool you’re using may already handle some of the CDP functionality you’re seeking.

How efficient are our marketing data processes?

Marketing software applications are supposed to improve data and campaign efficiency. But many times, disparate systems lead to data duplication, lack of standardization and an increase in time-consuming manual tasks. If you find yourself spending more time normalizing data or de-duplicating contact records, and less time executing campaigns or evaluating campaign performance, it might be time to automate data integration.

How would a CDP address our business needs and what are our use cases for the technology?

Virtually all CDPs deliver several core capabilities around data management, but many also provide a wide range of data analytics and orchestration features that address diverse business goals. What would having a single view of your customers do for you? For example, do you want to reduce churn by targeting customers with more relevant offers? Or increase the profitability of customer acquisition efforts by creating more accurate lookalike audiences? Don’t invest in a CDP before developing use cases that demonstrate how adoption will improve marketing performance or reduce costs. The investment should more than pay for itself.

Is your organization ready for a CDP?

Do you have enough clarity on your use cases and customer journeys to enable you to choose the correct solution? How will centralizing your data and audience definition impact your organization? Are you confident that all of the teams that would need to be involved — from IT to marketing to customer service — can be educated on the potential value of a CDP as part of the adoption project? Have you chosen early adopters within the organization that can provide proof points to other users?

What systems would we integrate through the CDP?

The martech stack is getting bigger and more complex for many organizations. Streamlining integration is a core benefit of implementing a CDP, which can normalize data for easier importing and exporting into other systems. As more brands engage in omnichannel marketing through numerous martech apps, creating a unified view of the customer has become critical to marketing success.

How will we define and then benchmark CDP success?

What key performance indicators (KPIs) do you want to measure, and what decisions will you make based on CDP implementation? For example, do you want to decrease data redundancy and track how that impacts the velocity of campaign execution? Or do you want to decrease the time your marketing staff spends on manually transferring data from one system to another? Set business goals in advance to be able to benchmark success later on. More than ever before, businesses seek to quantify the ROI of their martech investments.

Do we have management buy-in?

As with any major organizational investment, management support is essential to CDP success. Begin with small, short-term goals that demonstrate how the CDP is benefiting the business, either through cost savings or revenue gains. The key is to convince senior executives that having a single, unified view of the customer will add to the organization’s bottom line.

Do we need self-serve, full-serve or something in between?

CDPs are typically built for marketing end-users. However, CDPs vary in the scope of their capabilities — and it is important to have some level of ongoing training to use them all. CDP vendors provide varying levels of onboarding, customer support and/or professional services. Make sure you understand what your marketing staff will need to know to effectively use the CDP, or if you lack internal resources, what type of managed services are available?

What is the total cost of ownership?

CDP vendors charge monthly license fees based on the number of data records, events (or customer actions) and applications integrated. There may be additional fees for onboarding, APIs/custom integrations or staff training. Make sure you know your business needs, data volume and how you will need to restructure your systems and staff to enable a CDP’s operations. Being aware of all of these aspects will help you understand the investment your organization will make. Keep in mind, too, that you may see cost savings if the system allows people to work more efficiently.

Customer data platforms: A snapshot

What they are. Customer data platforms, or CDPs, have become more prevalent than ever. These help marketers identify key data points from customers across a variety of platforms, which can help craft cohesive experiences. They are especially hot right now as marketers face increasing pressure to provide a unified experience to customers across many channels. 

Understanding the need. Cisco’s Annual Internet Report found that internet-connected devices are growing at a 10% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2018 to 2023. COVID-19 has only sped up this marketing transformation. Technologies are evolving at a faster rate to connect with customers in an ever-changing world.

Each of these interactions has something important in common: they’re data-rich. Customers are telling brands a little bit about themselves at every touchpoint, which is invaluable data. What’s more, consumers expect companies to use this information to meet their needs.

Why we care. Meeting customer expectations, breaking up these segments, and bringing them together can be demanding for marketers. That’s where CDPs come in. By extracting data from all customer touchpoints — web analytics, CRMs, call analytics, email marketing platforms, and more — brands can overcome the challenges posed by multiple data platforms and use the information to improve customer experiences. 

Read next: What is a CDP and how does it give marketers the coveted ‘single view’ of their customers? 

The post Does your organization need a customer data platform or CDP? appeared first on MarTech.

Today, Snapchat announced it is launching a catalog-powered tool, Shopping Lenses, adding to the augmented reality experience that is already used by social commerce shoppers more than 6 billion times per day on the social platform.

Augmented reality is changing the way we shop, play, and learn, and transforming how businesses tell their stories and sell their products,” said Jeremi Gorman, Chief Business Officer for Snap Inc. “Starting today, our revamped AR Shopping Lenses will mean a more engaging experience for our Snapchat community, and enable a faster, easier way to build Lenses for businesses

Upgraded AR experience. Shopping Lenses provides product information and SKU-specific purchase capabilities. Prices and color details are dynamically updated in real-time, allowing users to make purchases on items and styles that are in-stock and ready to ship.

Cutting down on the clicks that it takes for a user to track down and buy a product that they like when they see it on social, Shopping Lenses allows a shopper to purchase an item with one tap on the Lens Product Card triggered by the experience.

Read more: 2022 Predictions: E-commerce everywhere

Results for brands. Real-time updates for the customer experience also mean real-time analytics for marketers. Brands gain insights and intent data when a product is being tried on virtually in Shopping Lenses.

Shopping Lenses with Product Card. Image: Snap Inc.

These signals can help businesses optimize their Snapchat presence and increase sales by reaching the right customers. It can also help product development by showing brands what products and features are taking off on Snap.

Beta partners for Shopping Lenses include Ulta Beauty and MAC Cosmetics. Ulta Beauty saw $6 million in incremental purchases on Snapchat using the catalog-powered Shopping Lenses, with over 30 million product try-ons in a two-week period. MAC Cosmetics saw 2.4-times higher lift in brand awareness, and 9 times higher lift in purchase intent.

Why we care. Social media platforms are adding features to remove friction and enable interested users to purchase products in a seamless way, which improves experience for customers with high intent.

Stepping back a bit, we can also see how AR and other 3D imaging technologies are becoming must-haves for marketers in specific industries, including beauty, fashion and retail more generally. 

The post Snapchat launches augmented reality tool Shopping Lenses appeared first on MarTech.

Webinar: The next big thing in ABM

POSTED BY January 30, 2022

Account-Based Marketing is essential to any B2B strategy. And advanced practitioners are now looking for the tools to give them an edge to better connect with their audiences.

This requires sales and marketing to work together to identify and engage buying groups within their target accounts. Enter Buying Group Marketing.

To learn more, register today for “Market, Engage and Sell to Buying Groups Who Want to Hear From You,” presented by Influ2.

The post Webinar: The next big thing in ABM appeared first on MarTech.

Good morning: The future of CTV

POSTED BY January 30, 2022

MarTech’s daily brief features daily insights, news, tips, and essential bits of wisdom for today’s digital marketer. If you would like to read this before the rest of the internet does, sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox daily.

Good morning, Marketers, and today we take a closer look at the CTV landscape.

CTV is very device-driven, so marketers were watching CES closely earlier this month to see what new kinds of screens will find their way into homes. This has broad implications for consumer behavior, and forces marketers to reconsider the channels where they engage customers.

More social media apps are migrating to the CTV ecosystem through new device features like Samsung’s Smart Hub. But marketers can’t be sure how their specific customers expect a trusted brand to appear on such a format. Is it social, or is it TV, or some combination of the two, or something entirely new?

An experimental mindset and attention to campaign performance metrics will guide marketers through these new touchpoints. No wonder there is such a high demand for data in the CTV space, which explains the many data collaborations and partnerships that have been formed over the last year.

All of this influence in CTV from other digital channels – the short-form video imported from social, for instance – means that CTV is expected to continue to grow. Just last summer, The Trade Desk’s Jeff Green predicted that it will represent at least one half of global advertising’s trillion dollar pie.

Chris Wood,

Editor

Shorts

Quote of the day. “The evolution of social is that it’s moving to TV, which makes a lot of sense right now because of social’s video content, which is becoming more important in the TV industry.” Katelyn Sorensen, CEO, Loomly

The post Good morning: The future of CTV appeared first on MarTech.

Want to jump straight to the answer? The best time and attendance systems for most people are Rippling and OnTheClock.

Time and attendance systems lets you track employee hours and manage pay—crucial tasks for every business with a workforce.

The best time and attendance systems are simple to implement and manage. Your employees will always be compensated appropriately for their work while eliminating bottlenecks in payroll.

The 8 Best Time and Attendance Systems of 2021

How to choose the best time and attendance system. Quicksprout.com's methodology for reviewing time and attendance systems.

That’s why good time and attendance systems integrate popular online payroll services.

If your current system is inaccurate or outdated, you could be costing your business tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars each year.

So if you need an updated time system, you’ve come to the right place.

No matter what type of business you have or what industry you’re in, this guide will help you find the best time tracking and attendance system for your company.

I’ll give you an in-depth review of each option below. We’ll discuss the top features, benefits, costs, and other considerations to give you the information needed to make a decision.

Best Time and Attendance Systems Reviews

Rippling — Best for Running Payroll in Two Minutes or Less

  • Built-in payroll solution
  • Create custom workflows
  • Potent automation features
  • Starts at $8/employee per month

Try Rippling for Free

If you already have payroll software in place that you love, you’re looking for a time and attendance solution that integrates with it seamlessly. Otherwise, you’ll get frustrated with manual data entry or messy or incomplete importing from your time tracking tool.

But what if you’re thinking, “Well, I could use better payroll software too.”

Enter Rippling.

Rippling homepage.

With it you get top-of-the-line time tracking software that is built to streamline your workload and automate routine actions. It’s incredibly easy to set up automated workflows (say, for a simple example, if an employee works over eight hours and incurs an overtime rate) and customize them with simple-to-learn triggers and logic.

But what really grabs you is how much easier Rippling’s time and attendance system makes running your payroll.

With the intelligent technology behind the platform, you can run your payroll in as little as 90 seconds. With no importing/exporting of spreadsheets or .csv files, Rippling ports the hours logged over to its payroll module and takes it from there.

It smartly factors in deductions, taxes, variable pay rates, and more. All that’s left for you to do is review and approve and, voila, payroll is taken care of.

The combination of payroll and time and attendance tracking in Rippling means you get everything you need from both, including:

  • Automatic tax, employee, and labor compliance
  • Automatic tax filings
  • Global payments to employees and contractors
  • PTO tracking
  • Custom reporting
  • Geolocated, QR code-based, and selfie clock-in

And, you get all the essentials of time tracking software. Employees can clock in and out using a tablet, the Rippling app, or through their computer.  You get to review and approve hours worked and assistance with meeting labor law regulations on breaks and overtime.

And, with that perfect payroll integration, you get clear, real-time insight into labor costs.

Rippling offers custom pricing to its clients, depending on what combination of Rippling services they need. Beyond payroll and time tracking, there are also solutions for benefits administration, recruiting, and internal IT management.

Pricing starts at $8/user per month. Get a free custom demo.

OnTheClock — Best for Businesses with Regular Service Calls

  • Thorough GPS tracking
  • Can try out for free
  • Integration w/ major payroll software
  • Perfect for field service

Try it for Free

A service company has a wider range of needs from time and attendance tracking software than most others.

We’re talking about businesses like a construction operation, an IT firm, an insurance company, or anything else where you’re dispatching employees constantly throughout the day. If that’s you, you’re going to find the features you need in OnTheClock.

Whereas many other time tracking solutions allow for GPS tagging on clock-ins, few give you full visibility into where your techs or reps are in real-time and where they’ve been throughout the workday.

OnTheClock’s GPS time clock allows your workers to check in on their own mobile device or an approved device upon arriving and leaving each job site.

OnTheClock homepage.

But it’s the real-time GPS tracking that goes the extra mile (without overstepping into invading worker privacy). In the OnTheClock interface, you can see at a glance who’s where they’re supposed to be and who isn’t.

And, with the breadcrumb feature, you can also see if workers are sticking to their schedule and staying at the job site when they’re supposed to.

You can also set up geofencing to make sure employees only clock in when they’re actually present at the location and drop pins for punch-in spots for when jobs are more remote or in between sites.

Plus, with custom-set employee roles, you can make it easier to switch between jobs without clocking out for your team members who wear many hats when out in the field.

Beyond those key features for organization that regularly send employees out into the field, such as automatic PTO and overtime tracking, employee requests within the platform and app, scheduling, and project cost and invoicing assistance.

OnTheClock also integrates fantastically with all the big payroll platforms out there, such as ADP, Quickbooks, Gusto, Paychex, and more.

Pricing is wonderfully straightforward. With no contact, no limitations on features, and no base monthly fee, you simply pay for the number of employees you have as active users on OnTheClock.

For just one or two employees, it’s completely free (which also can function as a free trial for test driving the platform out). From there it scales down, starting at $3/employee per month:

  • 3-10 employees: $3/employee per month (e.g. five employees = $15/month)
  • 11-25 employees: $2.95/employee per month
  • 26-50 employees: $2.90/employee per month
  • 51-100 employees: $2.85/employee per month

This continues all the way up to 301-400 users ($2.70/employee per month). Custom pricing is available for teams larger than that.

Get started with OnTheClock by trying it for free today.

QuickBooks Time (formerly TSheets) — Best for Remote Workers and QuickBooks Integration

  • Plans start at $28/month
  • Time tracking on any device
  • Employee scheduling
  • QuickBooks integration

>> Compare Quotes

QuickBooks Time (formerly TSheets) ranked high on our list of the best employee scheduling software. So it’s no surprise to see them at the top of this guide.

TSheets was famous for how well it helped keep track of workers in the field and on jobsites, and QB Time has kept all those helpful features.

Your employees clock-in from anywhere using the mobile timesheet app. The app will track time even if WiFi and cell service is unavailable.

You can leverage geofencing technology to draw a virtual radius around your business or job site. This allows you to make sure your employees are where they need to be to get the job done.

QuickBooks Time multiple platforms demo page.

As I’ve already alluded to, the employee scheduling features are exceptional as well. This is an added bonus that comes standard with your time and attendance system.

For those of you who want a more traditional time clock system, where your staff and clock in and clock out on the same device, you can use the Clock Kiosk. The kiosk works on any tablet or computer with a connection to the Internet.

Each employee has a unique 4-digit pin. The system also has a biometric facial recognition tool to prevent the “buddy punching” system.

Here’s a quick comparison of the two plans and pricing options for QB Time:

Premium — $20 base fee + $8 per user per month

  • Time tracking on any device
  • Mobile app with GPS capability
  • Payroll and invoicing
  • QuickBooks integration
  • Employee scheduling
  • Real-time reporting
  • Time clock kiosk (including facial recognition)

Elite — $40 base fee + $10 per user per month

  • All Premium features
  • Timesheet signatures
  • Geofencing
  • Project activity feed and estimates
  • Track project progress

Both plans are available for a 14-day trial for any business that wants to test them out.

I’d recommend this product to any business that wants to a time and attendance system to simplify their payroll process. It integrates seamlessly with QuickBooks accounting software (obviously), but also Gusto, Square, Expensify, Xero, and other popular solutions.

TimeClock Plus — Best for Large Businesses and Secured Access Control

  • Customized pricing
  • Wide range of time clocks
  • Fully customizable
  • Top of the line equipment

>> Compare Quotes

TimeClock Plus gives you great time tracking solutions at an affordable cost.

Their hardware is top of the line. You can rest easy knowing their features and tools are up to snuff.

Depending on your business type, TimeClock Plus has a wide range of time clocks for you to consider:

  • Barcode clocks — Employees scan their badges to clock in and out
  • Biometric clocks — Fingerprint scanners and hand scanners
  • Magnetic swipe clocks — Can be used with pre-existing magstripe cards
  • PIN entry clocks — Employees clock in and out using their unique PINs
  • Proximity clocks — To ensure maximum speed and efficiency
  • Web clock — For online time keeping

In addition to using advanced equipment for tracking time and attendance, TimeClock Plus doubles as a security feature. You’ll have the option to configure select equipment with your door locks to prevent unauthorized access to buildings, rooms, or any other entrance with a locked door.

TimeClockPlus attendance and time data screen.

This type of system is best for larger organizations with complex security needs. Most small business owners won’t need employees to scan a fingerprint to enter rooms throughout the building.

TimeClock Plus systems are fully customizable.

It has built-in absence management tools and integrates with your employee scheduling software as well. Alternatively, you can use the TimeClock Plus workforce scheduling system if you don’t have one already.

TimeClock Plus has more than 30 years of experience providing services to businesses. They provide top of the line equipment for every time and attendance system.

While these time clocks might sound complex, TimeClock Plus makes the process easy for you.

You’ll have a consultation with an advisor to find the best solution for your business. They’ll set up the system for you and even train your supervisors and employees on how to use it.

As a fully-customized solution, there are no prices available online. Although you can expect to pay top dollar for advanced equipment like biometrics that syncs with your security system.

Stratustime — Best Cloud-Based Software for Small Businesses

  • Starts at $4/mo per employee
  • Access on any device
  • Works with 60+ payroll systems
  • Cloud-based and easy to use

>> Compare Quotes

Stratustime is a cloud-based time and attendance software from Nettime Solutions.

The offer a simple yet intuitive way for employees to clock in, clock out, and request time off.

It’s incredibly simple for anyone to use. Mangers, employees, and even payroll staff benefit from Stratustime.

Stratustime is flexible, offering plans and services for a company of any size. This means that it can grow with your business as you scale and add new employees.

It also integrates with 60+ payroll systems to ensure a streamlined process through each HR component.

Stratustime workflow and process diagram.

As a cloud-based system, it can be accessed on any device. From smartphones to a computer in the office, Stratustime is available 24/7.

Some of the top features of Stratustime by Nettime Solutions include:

  • Ability to clock in or clock out from anywhere
  • Intuitive schedule views
  • Hour tracking
  • PTO accruals
  • Time off requests
  • Sick time
  • Simple manager approvals
  • Employee scheduling tools
  • Time forecasting
  • Alerts
  • Geofencing
  • ACA compliance

While the exact prices and plans aren’t available on the website, Stratustime is very affordable. This is another reason why it’s a top choice for small businesses.

Monthly rates start as low as $4 per employee. There are no long term contracts, so you can cancel at any time if you’re unhappy (which probably won’t happen).

Using a cloud-based software like Stratustime means you won’t have any complicated equipment installations or troubleshooting problems. The software lives in the cloud, so it can be up and running in minutes.

Existing businesses using Stratustime have nothing but good things to say about the software. For smaller organizations with one location, multiple locations, and remote employees, Stratustime is an excellent choice for your time and attendance system.

UKG (formerly Kronos) — Best for Small to Midsize Businesses

  • Industry-specific solutions
  • Safe, secure, and reliable
  • Automation tools
  • Real-time data & visibility reports

>> Compare Quotes

UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group) was formed by a merger between two major players in the HR tech space, Kronos and Ultimate Group.

Kronos had one of the most extensive time and attendance systems on the market, and it’s only gotten better since the merger in 2020.

UKG is going to be overkill the really small business, or one that’s never going to grow beyond a few dozen employees.

But it’s a solid idea for businesses that are looking to use time tracking along side other HR and business management software. UKG can keep your workforce management, employee scheduling, HR database, analytics, payroll, and human capital management under one roof.

Common industries that use UKG for time and attendance management include:

  • Health care
  • Retail
  • Manufacturing
  • Higher education
  • State and government
  • Contract services
  • Banking
  • Police and corrections
  • Distribution

What makes UKG unique is the way that they provide business solutions. They have several different product suites to accommodate the needs of your organization.

UKG Ready

  • Best for small business HR
  • Flexible pay rules to track and manage labor costs
  • Manager and employee self-service tools
  • Multiple collection options (including time clock on web and mobile)
  • Enforce attendance policy with tracking tools

UKG Dimensions

  • Best for midsize or large organization workforce management
  • Use data to power your management
  • Data collection using handheld devices, phone access, badge and biometrics
  • Devices for multiple environments and universal device manager
  • Streamlined data flow

UKG Pro

  • Best for midsize or large organization human capital management
  • Unified suite for payroll, recruiting, talent, time and attendance

You can get a product suite for practically anything. Some are more complex than others. It all depends on what your business is looking for.

Regardless of the solution you choose, Kronos systems are safe, secure, modern, and reliable.

Contact their sales team to request a quote and schedule a consultation.

uAttend — Best for Very Small Businesses

  • Powerful, reliable, & affordable
  • Web and mobile app access
  • Multiple time clock options
  • Connected to the cloud

>> Compare Quotes

uAttend is a simple way to track time and attendance at your business developed by Workwell. It’s a powerful, reliable, and affordable alternative to traditional time clocks.

You’ll also have web access and mobile app access to the system. This is an ideal feature for your remote workforce. You can even set up geofencing functionality to restrict punches to designated locations.

I love their web dashboard. It’s the perfect way for managers to see everything at a glance. You’ll be able to see who’s working, who missed a punch, and dozens of other reports.

Since this solution is web-based, you won’t have to download any software, and it can be accessed from anywhere. Even if you’re away from the office you’ll know exactly what’s going on with your staff at all times.

Here’s a quick overview of some of the popular time clocks and hardware offered by uAttend:

  • RFID Card LAN Time Clock — $119
  • Fingerprint LAN Time Clock — $149
  • Touch Tablet Wifi Time Clock — $179
  • RFID Card Wifi Time Clock — $219
  • Fingerprint Wifi Time Clock — $249
  • Facial Recognition LAN Time Clock — $259

Depending on your needs, you can get a time clock for somewhere in the $120 to $260 range. This is extremely affordable, even for very small businesses.

In addition to the time clocks, you can purchase RFID cards and key fobs from uAttend as well.

All of the time clocks come with a monthly subscription based on the number of employees you have. The clocks won’t work without a subscription. All of the prices are transparent.

  • 1-9 employees — $20 per month
  • 10-19 employees — $34 per month
  • 20-49 employees — $59 per month
  • 50-99 employees — $94 per month
  • 100+ employees — $119 per month

While uAttend does have plans to accommodate larger organizations, I’d definitely recommend it to those of you who have a smaller operation. It’s an ideal solution for businesses that fall within those first two tiers of up to 19 employees. Beyond that, I’d look elsewhere.

iSolved Time — Best for Growing Businesses

  • All-in-one solution
  • Extremely flexible options
  • Cloud-based system
  • Employee scheduling tools

>> Compare Quotes

iSolved Time is another all-in-one solution for time and attendance. It’s a simple way for managers, supervisors, business owners, and employees to manage time tracking.

They offer a wide variety of solutions including physical time clocks, a mobile app for time tracking, employee self-service tools, and a combination of these offerings.

Setting up your new system from iSolved Time is quick and easy. You’ll also have access to a wide range of training options, so you know the ins and outs of the solution.

Like many other choices on our list, iSolved Time is a cloud-based system. You’ll have the option to add physical time clocks on-site, but you can access information from anywhere with an Internet connection 24/7.

Here are some of the top features and benefits of the iSolved Time software:

  • Geofencing capability
  • Employee scheduling tools
  • Ability to accommodate remote employees, multiple worksites and locations
  • Time management tools
  • Choice of time collection methods (virtual clock, physical, mobile app)
  • Sophisticated HR integration

I like iSolved Time because they have the features and capabilities to accommodate any business size. That’s why it’s a top solution for those of you with growing businesses.

As your company scales and you continue to add new employees to your team or multiple locations, iSolved Time has the capacity to grow with you.

How to Choose the Best Time and Attendance System For Your Business

Now the best part: it’s time to choose a good time and attendance system.

Not sure how to choose? Don’t worry. Just follow our methodology to narrow down your options.

This is the same rubric we used when determining this list. I’ll describe the features that you need to look out for while you’re browsing.

Compare Quotes From The Best Best Time And Attendance Systems

Get matched up with a time and attendance system that fits your needs.

>> Compare Quotes

Hardware

The very first thing you need to do is determine if you want physical hardware associated with your time and attendance system.

For those of you who are already using punch cards, a modern time clock is a viable replacement. I’d recommend this for businesses where the majority of employees work on-site at the same location. Punching in and out as they enter and exit makes the most sense.

For those of you with smaller teams or lots of remote or mobile workers, hardware won’t be necessary. You can find a time tracking system with a mobile app for managing everything on the go. There are also web-based solutions that don’t require hardware either.

Punch Method

The punch method will obviously depend on if you’re using hardware or not. But there are still variations with or without physical equipment.

For example, mobile app punching can be managed using geofencing technology. Your staff will only be able to clock in if they enter the designed location for a job site.

When it comes to in-person clock-ins and outs, there are time clocks that work with PINs, RFID cards, fingerprints, hand prints, facial recognition, and more.

A small coffee shop probably won’t need facial recognition or other biometrics as the punch method, but a sophisticated business with advanced security needs would benefit from this feature.

Integrations

Your new time and attendance system should do more than just track time. It should integrate with other tools that you’re using to minimize manual administrative tasks.

Look for a solution that integrates with your employee scheduling software or payroll system. Some of the options on our list have these features built-in.

Business Size

A startup team of four and mid-market companies with 200 employees will not have the same time and attendance needs. It’s important to find a solution that works well for the size of your organization.

Lots must be taken into consideration here. Some systems charge you based on the size of your staff. You could even incur additional costs for things like key FOBs and ID cards.

If you currently have a smaller business now, make sure you choose a system that can scale with you as your business grows. That way, you won’t have to switch systems as you hire additional employees or open up new locations.

The Top Time and Attendance Systems in Summary

Rippling, OnTheClock, and QuickBooks Time stand out as the best time and attendance systems on the market. These solutions, along with the other top picks on our list, make it easy for any business to accurately track employee time.

The best time and attendance systems sync with your payroll provider to ensure seamless and accurate pay runs every time.

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According to data released by advertising intelligence platform MediaRadar, spending on podcast advertising was up over 20% YoY in 2021. Q4 ad spend alone was $160 million, making a total of $590 million for the year. It is estimated that more than a third of Americans now listen to podcasts regularly. Technology brands became the biggest spenders, pushing media into second place.

Familiar names among the top 10 highest spending podcast advertisers are Amazon, Capital One, Comcast and State Farm. Most podcast advertising is located midroll with durations of 30 and 60 seconds being most common. Brands seem confident in the effectiveness of podcast advertising, with 79% of advertisers from 2020 continuing to buy in 2021.

Read next: How to get the best ROI from podcast advertising

Why we care. We say yet again, channels are proliferating. This means fragmented audiences, of course, but also potentially highly engaged audiences. Podcasts create the opportunity for focused contextual advertising as well as for more general brand messaging.

Speaking of messages, consumers (and B2B buyers) are delivering a clear one. Meet us where we are.

The post Podcast advertising spend surged in 2021 appeared first on MarTech.

Fasten your seatbelts. This article will be hotly debated. 

The martech industry is actually in a revenue bubble, like the dot-com bubble of 1995 and the housing bubble of 2008. And there’s no telling how soon it will burst. 

The revenue bubble happens when go-to-market teams, and the technologies they use, organize as one central group with one goal: Sales. The role of the chief revenue officer and the function of revenue operations emerged from this.

The problem? What started as a rallying cry for marketers to drive more impact has sadly devolved into a sea of sameness, with business brands that are eerily identical in how they look, sound, and engage customers. 

Before you get too upset, hear me out.

As a career B2B marketer, I’ve always been a champion of revenue. One of my favorite books is “Revenue Disruption” by Phil Fernandez, co-founder of Marketo. Every activity should lead to a sale! That was the motto. 

But the more I worked in marketing, the more I started to see that some of the best companies didn’t focus on revenue alone. There was more to their success, which we’ll explore in this article. 

Without revenue, what’s the point?  

Here’s why the revenue movement became popular. Marketers were tired of being treated like sales assistants. They were sometimes referred to as the arts and crafts department. I’ll admit, the revenue movement did a fine job in changing this perception.

The problem? The focus on revenue is short-term. 

And I may be biased, working for a company that obsesses over customer experience at the expense of short-term profits, but let’s look at both sides. 

Three powerful, durable spears pierce the revenue bubble. They are community, product-led growth and brand.

1. Community

Community is not, and never should be, about revenue. And while you can tie some attribution to community-led efforts, trying to extract money out of a community is inauthentic. Customers can smell inauthenticity. We’ve often seen members abandon communities that try to milk them for every last cent. We’ve also seen communities help skyrocket companies to become market leaders. Marketo and Salesforce are great examples, but there are many others. There are different skills and competencies required to grow a community, which revenue-focused operators may lack. 

2. Product-led growth 

Product-led growth refers to creating such a good product experience that users refer others, which becomes the primary method of adding new customers. The focus here is obsessing over user behavior and feedback, and implementing quick changes. A short-term focus on revenue (closing big deals) can be counterproductive to this effort. 

You’ve probably seen this first-hand in your organization. A team has dozens of planning and negotiation meetings with a vendor, only to discover that employees have already started using a different platform they paid for with their credit card. 

That’s not to say that enterprise sales and field marketing are irrelevant. Both can drive tremendous growth and awareness. However, product-led growth is tangible proof that there is more to the story than mere revenue. 

3. Brand 

Branding is the most obvious contradiction to the revenue movement. It’s incredibly difficult to attribute deals to branding. You can track branded search terms or ask, “how did you hear about us?” but much of the influence that brand has occurred without our knowledge. Branding is what happens when a buyer needs something at the moment, and your company is top of mind. Brand transpires when a buyer doesn’t make a rational decision based on facts but emotion. 

For example, I selected my car insurance provider solely because I liked the jingle “Nationwide is on your side.” Such a good tune! As a final example, take 10 seconds and think of your top three favorite companies. Got them? Now the question: Do you think they got to where they are today by aligning around revenue? 

The problem with every employee having the goal of revenue 

The problem with everyone having a revenue goal is that other critical aspects, such as customer experience, can fall to the wayside. Not to mention the historical examples of immoral company leaders who focused on revenue above the customer and drove the company’s reputation and stock price into the ground. 

But let’s take a practical B2B approach. Should graphic designers be given a revenue goal? What about corporate communications? What about legal and those who protect the security of customer data? And to take it a step further, if those roles do not have revenue goals, does that mean that those roles are unimportant? 

Here is where the revenue bubble begins to burst because if everything should be about revenue, nothing else matters. 

But other aspects of business do matter. And successful brands know that very well. 

How to stop the revenue bubble from growing and bursting

The solution to the revenue bubble is tension. Healthy tension, healthy debate and a natural, productive conflict that forces one side back into balance when it gets out of line. Should there be a revenue goal? Yes. But there should be a customer experience goal set in parallel. Customer experience can be measured by satisfaction, NPS, engagement, opt-out, and other indicators that show customers like (or dislike) your brand. 

Should there be a new sales goal? Of course. But in parallel, there should be a community-growth goal, a branding goal and a product goal not tied to sales. 

Balance your revenue goals with the customer experience and balance sales with your brand. 

To sum up, while companies have benefited from the alignment that the revenue movement has created, they need to be careful not to lose sight of the less measurable aspects of the business that can differentiate a brand in the long term. And while many operators are looking to revenue as the single answer to solve their business problems, the reality is that business, like life, rarely boils down to a single thing. 

The post Is martech in a revenue bubble and how soon will it burst? appeared first on MarTech.

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